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Ballcap
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 5:01 pm Reply with quote
ejly
 
Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 4


I picked up the term "ballcap" from some people I worked in 2004 with who were from Tennessee. It seems like a much more elegant and concise term than "baseball cap" especially when one considers how often ballcaps are worn by Quarterbacks, Hoopsters, etc. - sports figures who have nothing to do with baseball.

I was wondering is this a Tennessee specific term or something used widely in a certain region? I am a midwesterner and was unfamiliar with the term until I heard it from them.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2006 12:16 pm Reply with quote
katileka
 
Joined: 04 Sep 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Arkansas


My roommate and I sat 'hat' to refer to a ballcap/baseball hat. Any sort of non-baseball hat is first refered to a particular name.

I've never really said 'ballcap' nor heard many people say that.


So I guess people here just assume that if you're wearing a hat then you must be wearing something like this:

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:55 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


To me, the cap pictured in that last post, and to which this thead refers, is a "baseball cap." Even though caps of this design are worn by people in many different walks of life (and even on the sidelines of football games), its essential design comes from the game of baseball.

Although the official rules of baseball do not even require that a cap be worn, the design of this "ball cap" came from the cap that is worn by baseball players during the game (as opposed to coaches on the sidelines or fans in the bleachers).

(The fact that the rules don't specify a design for a cap might explain some of the bizarre hat designs seen in the 1970s and early 1980s by teams such as Pittsburgh, for example.)

I noticed summer before last when I was in Germany that my German-speaking friends referred to the cap I was wearing not as a "M?tze" (German for "cap"), but rather a "baseball cap," in good American English.

As my hair has thinned in my advancing age, I have become a big fan of hats, such as the fedora I wore to school today. In my mind, a hat and a ball cap are two quite distinct things.

But let us also stipulate that I am an old fart in his 50s!

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 3:27 pm Reply with quote
Monika
 
Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Hamburg, Germany


Dave wrote:


I noticed summer before last when I was in Germany that my German-speaking friends referred to the cap I was wearing not as a "M?tze" (German for "cap"), but rather a "baseball cap," in good American English.


"M?tze" is a generic word for a soft mostly woolen hat, i.e. a beret is a "Baskenm?tze". The cognate for cap would be "Kappe", it connotes "hardness". "Hut" denotes a more formal hat, your fedora would be called "Filzhut" or perhaps "Schlapphut", depending on the shape of the brim.

Razz Heargear seems to complex in both languages.

Monika
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Ballcap
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