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A phrase you only found out later was "family only"
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 10:53 am Reply with quote
katyly
 
Joined: 04 Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Minneapolis, MN


My mom was describing my uncle learning how to drive. They grew up in Ames, IA and she said, "He had that old Dodge in and out of every ditch in Story County."

When I was growing up in Illinois, I would use the phrase "in and out of every ditch in Story County" to mean every ditch. I didn't figure out until I was an adult that no one else ever used that phrase. It was more literal than I interpreted it.

Likewise, my husband has a similar story about something his mom used to say, "All over hell and Jasper County" which he used to mean all over, but then found out no one else ever used.

When I found out that we both had the same experience, I wondered if other people out there have as well. Anyone?

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 9:34 pm Reply with quote
ptillen
 
Joined: 14 Apr 2007
Posts: 22


I think I always knew it was a family-only expression, but I just wanted to share this cause it's cute: you know those Christmas trees with lights that flash on and off, like a neon sign? Well my family refers to them as "Eat-at-Joe's trees".
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Or, maybe it's just me that thinks it cute, who knows...
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:37 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


ptillen wrote:
I think I always knew it was a family-only expression, but I just wanted to share this cause it's cute: you know those Christmas trees with lights that flash on and off, like a neon sign? Well my family refers to them as "Eat-at-Joe's trees".
Very Happy
Or, maybe it's just me that thinks it cute, who knows...

Oh no, I think that's brilliant. I get the meaning of "Eat-at-Joe's trees" immediately, without any explanation whatsoever.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 8:21 pm Reply with quote
GimliNZ
 
Joined: 10 Aug 2006
Posts: 9
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand


My Dad had some great expressions for 'putting me off the scent'.

Whenever we were going anywhere, and I would ask him where - he would reply "To see a man about a dog" It took me years to realise we were never going to be getting a dog!! Sad

If he replied something along the lines of "to the hardware store/shop", I would ask what he was getting, he would then reply "A wigwam for a goose's bridle" or a "hoo dacky doo flicky".

Whether these were my family only, I don't know but I've never heard them said by anybody else.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 12:39 pm Reply with quote
jppbl
 
Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Chicago


Whenever we were going anywhere, and I would ask him where - he would reply "To see a man about a dog" It took me years to realise we were never going to be getting a dog!!


Whenever my father had to use the restroom, he would pick up a magazine and announce that he was "going to see a man about a horse." I never did find the man or his horse in there!
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:03 pm Reply with quote
RaeDK
 
Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 2
Location: Wisconsin, USA


My husband is fond of the phrase "going to see a man about a horse too"

Here's one that was definitely "family only" in my house when my sister and I were growing up.

When we were in trouble for saying or doing something my mother felt was upsetting or humiliating, she had a habit of saying,

"Are you trying to make a monkey out of me?"

She would be seriously angry when she said it, but it was really hard not to laugh, or picture angry apes beating their chests as I was being scolded. She would not find a smirk amusing at that point. We laugh about it now, as it became affectionately known as "the monkey lecture".
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A phrase you only found out later was "family only"
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