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The “preterite perfect” (PrP)?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 7:29 am Reply with quote
Bridget
 
Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 77


Have you witnessed examples of the present perfect being collocated with definite past-time temporal adverbials in your variant of English? If so, do you think that use suggests major changes are on the way regarding the way the present perfect will be used in the future?

e.g.

He's done that last year.

Background to the question:

http://www.ling.canterbury.ac.nz/documents/RCoxthesis.pdf

(See Abstract.)
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 12:46 am Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


In my variety of English, I'd never say this sentence. Nor can I recall hearing such usage. I have heard--sometimes from myself, surprisingly--the use of the past tense when the perfect is called for:

Did you eat already? instead of Have you eaten already.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:55 pm Reply with quote
thegooseking
 
Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 64
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland


Bloomer wrote:
In my variety of English, I'd never say this sentence. Nor can I recall hearing such usage. I have heard--sometimes from myself, surprisingly--the use of the past tense when the perfect is called for:

Did you eat already? instead of Have you eaten already.


Do you, by any chance, speak a lot to people who have French as a native language? I've noticed myself doing this, particularly after talking to French-speakers. This is presumably because French makes no distinction between the two tenses (in either case it would be as-tu déja mangé?).

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:23 pm Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


I sometimes hear this from my ESL clients--which I eventually correct, but I don't hear this from native speakers (except maybe when they start a sentence in one direction and then shift in another midstream).
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The “preterite perfect” (PrP)?
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