Register FAQ Memberlist Search The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index Visit our homepage

The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index » Non-English languages » The thing with time...
Post new topic  Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic 
The thing with time...
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 4:07 pm Reply with quote
Yussi
 
Joined: 20 Jul 2006
Posts: 16
Location: Vienna, Austria


In the Germain language area there are different ways to arrange a time of day:
In Vienna it's "viertel eins" (quater one, meaning 12:15), "halb eins" (half one, meaning 12:30) and "dreiviertel eins" (threequaters one, meaning 12:45).
That often leads to confusion, since in other parts of Austria it's: "viertel ?ber/nach 12" (quater over/after 12), again "halb eins" and "viertel vor 1" (quater before one).

I don't wanna know how many dates don't work, because of this phenomenon ;o)

In school I learned in English it's: quater past, half past and quater to. Are there different ways, which lead to similar problems as in German?
What about other languages?

_________________
------
English still is a foreign language to me: Please feel free to correct huge gramatical and ortographical mistakes.

Check out "Pick sieht fern" my weekly podcast about TV.
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 3:37 am Reply with quote
RabiAkiva
 
Joined: 28 Jun 2006
Posts: 163
Location: Israel


Dutch is like German. 'Half een' is 'Halb eins', meaning 12:30, whereas an Englishman with 'Half one' means 13:30. As does the Frenchman 'Une heur et demie' or the Israeli 'אחד וחצי' [Echad wachetzi].

Similarly with numbers over twenty. The English, French and Hebrew says twenty and one (twenty one, vingt et un, עשרים ואחד [esrim wa-echad]) but the German and the Dutch say one and twenty (Einundzwanzig, Eenentwintig).

But then again, numbers are the most confusing in French. Seventy-one being sixty and eleven (soixante onze), eighty-two being four twenty and two (quatre-vingt deux) and ninety six being four twenty and sixteen (quatre-vingt seize).

Numbers in Hebrew are pleasantly regular, but you have to get used to the fact that there are feminine and masculine numbers. Two men are anonther two than two women. And this goes on in the larger numbers. A hundred is feminine in itself and therefore hundreds are counted feminine; four hundred has a feminine four even if you count a male subject. Thousand is masculine and so four thousand has a masculine four even though you count something feminine.

_________________
l'hypocrisie c'est l'hommage du vice la vertu
Anne is a man; the blog: http://anneisaman.blogspot.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 5:09 pm Reply with quote
swiss
 
Joined: 23 Jan 2007
Posts: 2


in swissgerman we say: viertel ab ei(n)s instead of viertel nach/?ber eins
View user's profile Send private message ICQ Number
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:34 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


I never knew most of these German variations, I must admit.

The first time I encountered "Dreiviertel sechs," it was when my wife and I were supposed to be picked up to be taken to the train station. I repeated the time to the guy picking us up, several times, in several variations: "F?nf Uhr f?nfundvierzig, ja? Viertel vor sechs?" And then I was sure I understood.

I'll listen more closely this summer when I am in Switzerland and Austria.

_________________
The Word Nerds, a podcast about language
http://thewordnerds.org
Dave's Midlife Blog
http://davesmidlife.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 8:11 am Reply with quote
felika
 
Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Cologne, Germany


i remember meeting two english people - father and daughter, actually, so obviously coming from the same region - who used the expression 'half five'. now that i think about it, i'm not sure wether they referred to 4.30h or 5.30h. has any of you native english speakers around ever heard this? does anybody know in which region of the uk people talk that way?
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 9:14 am Reply with quote
RabiAkiva
 
Joined: 28 Jun 2006
Posts: 163
Location: Israel


felika wrote:
i remember meeting two english people - father and daughter, actually, so obviously coming from the same region - who used the expression 'half five'. now that i think about it, i'm not sure wether they referred to 4.30h or 5.30h. has any of you native english speakers around ever heard this? does anybody know in which region of the uk people talk that way?


I have heard this also. Half five is 5:30. Great confusion for us Dutch and Germans eh?

_________________
l'hypocrisie c'est l'hommage du vice la vertu
Anne is a man; the blog: http://anneisaman.blogspot.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2007 5:36 am Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


I'm pretty sure this is a general British usage. But I hope a UK forum member will post a reply to confirm this.

I think the form is widespread enough that American students have trouble with the German concept of "half fnf" when I teach it. We don't say "half five" in American English, but students hear it in movies or read it in books.

_________________
The Word Nerds, a podcast about language
http://thewordnerds.org
Dave's Midlife Blog
http://davesmidlife.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:16 pm Reply with quote
mjs
 
Joined: 25 Mar 2007
Posts: 13


The Portuguese time literally says the hours how I show above Smile

5:50 Five and fifty of morning ( cinco horas da manh )
17:50 Seventeen and fifty of afternoon ( cinco horas da tarde )
20:50 Eight and fifty of night ( cinco horas da noite )
12:00 Mid day ( meio-dia )
12:30 Mid day and Mid ( meio-dia e meio )
0:00 Mid night ( meia-noite )

_________________
_______________________________

Marcos Jos Setim
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:14 pm Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


RabiAkiva wrote:
The English, French and Hebrew says twenty and one (twenty one, vingt et un, עשרים ואחד [esrim wa-echad]) but the German and the Dutch say one and twenty (Einundzwanzig, Eenentwintig).


As a long-time speaker of German, I've always understood that it used double-digit numbers "backwards" from English, but it was only when reading this thread that I had the epiphany that German (and so also Dutch) is being "logical" in using one-and-twenty, two-and-twenty, etc. all the way through 99. The teens--in both English and German (with the exception of 11 and 12) are three-tenty, four-tenty, five-tenty, etc. Of course, the "ten-ty" designation is changed to "teen" (in German, "zehn"), but the pattern in German remains constant: the units numeral first, the tens numeral second (from 13 to 99).

Come to think of it, Spanish (and Portuguese) are consistent too: tens numeral first, units numeral second (diez y tres, diez y cuatro...veinte y uno, veinte y dos...). So only English is the goofy, out-of-whack language, switching horses in the middle of the stream.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:24 am Reply with quote
RabiAkiva
 
Joined: 28 Jun 2006
Posts: 163
Location: Israel


Bloomer wrote:
RabiAkiva wrote:
The English, French and Hebrew says twenty and one (twenty one, vingt et un, עשרים ואחד [esrim wa-echad]) but the German and the Dutch say one and twenty (Einundzwanzig, Eenentwintig).


As a long-time speaker of German, I've always understood that it used double-digit numbers "backwards" from English, but it was only when reading this thread that I had the epiphany that German (and so also Dutch) is being "logical" in using one-and-twenty, two-and-twenty, etc. all the way through 99. The teens--in both English and German (with the exception of 11 and 12) are three-tenty, four-tenty, five-tenty, etc. Of course, the "ten-ty" designation is changed to "teen" (in German, "zehn"), but the pattern in German remains constant: the units numeral first, the tens numeral second (from 13 to 99).

Come to think of it, Spanish (and Portuguese) are consistent too: tens numeral first, units numeral second (diez y tres, diez y cuatro...veinte y uno, veinte y dos...). So only English is the goofy, out-of-whack language, switching horses in the middle of the stream.


Yeah, yer goofy. Together with the French and their four twenty and sixteen for 96. Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing

_________________
l'hypocrisie c'est l'hommage du vice la vertu
Anne is a man; the blog: http://anneisaman.blogspot.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:50 pm Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


RA,
Let's not even get started with the goofiness of French numbering!
A.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
The thing with time...
  The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index » Non-English languages
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
All times are GMT - 4 Hours  
Page 1 of 1  

  
  
 Post new topic  Reply to topic  



Powered by phpBB  © phpBB Group phpBB Style by Trushkin.net