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Shaved Ice?
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 11:40 pm Reply with quote
toniroussel
 
Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Manassas, VA


I found Nathan's Dairy Bar (Yay!) and enjoyed their Tiger's Blood shaved ice. I've now had shaved ice in Virginia, Sno Cones in Pittsburgh, and Sno Balls in Louisiana. Oddly, I don't recall eating any such thing in Florida. Although Icees and Slurpees are similar, the ice is finer and quicker to liquefy. Do any other variations of the term shaved ice exist in other areas?
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shaved ice as sno-cones
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 11:57 pm Reply with quote
Howard Shepherd
 
Joined: 20 Jun 2006
Posts: 16
Location: Asheville, NC


When I was growing up on the rural route in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, there was an ice cream truck that came around in the summertime and sold sno-cones--cones of finely shaved ice with brightly colored flavorings that looked a little radioactive. This was the North Carolina equivalent of shaved ice.

I remember seeing a show on PBS a few years ago about Hawaii, and hearing the term "shave-ice" for the first time (referring to what I knew as a "sno-cone").
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 7:39 am Reply with quote
webhill
 
Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 50


Oh boy have you opened up a can of worms Smile
Non-Philadelphia natives may not be aware that lives have very nearly been lost as a result of this sort of discussion, but I have a scar to prove it, I kid you not.

I grew up in and around Philadelphia, PA, USA where we had a few different types of frozen ice treat. First, we had "sno-cones," a novelty sold by ice-cream vendors at public swimming pools and the like, which were essentially crushed ice in a paper cone, with flavored sugar syrup poured over them. Second, we had Slurpees, a non-dairy milkshake, if you will, sold by the convenience store 7-11 - and the knockoff type beverages of the same ilk at other convenience stores. These are essentially flavored slush that you drink through a straw. But, most importantly, we had and continue to have and will continue to have world without end amen -- WATER ICE.

Now, people who are not from around here will call our favorite frozen treat by other names, most notably "Italian Ice." There are even a few old-time vendors of the product here in Philadelphia whose "formal" name contains the phrase "Italian Ice." That being said, there is not a Philadelphian worth the mustard on his pretzel (ahem) who would call it anything but water ice. That's pronounced WOOD-er ice, by the way, and don't let anyone tell you differently.

Water ice is a fruit ice, dissimilar from the shaved ice of Hawaii and California by nature of being produced with blended whole fruits and frozen all together, instead of being produced by pouring a usually artificially flavored sugar syrup over a bunch of shaved ice. The shaved ices I have had in Hawaii and California have, by the way, had much more finely milled ice than I have ever seen in an East Coast sno-cone. The water ice comes in a paper cup and is solid enough to require eating with a spoon as opposed to simply slurping it up, unless it is August in Philadelphia, in which case it is a soupy mess from the moment it leaves the freezer but it still tastes good Smile

I hope this sheds some light on the subject. Oh, I might additionally comment that some people have likened water ice to a particularly hard or firm granita, but my palate says water ice is generally smoother. Granita usually has a flakier more granular crystalline structure than a good water ice does. Seriously.

Personally, I prefer a good gelato. I'm a big fan of the fig gelato available at the stand just across the square from the Hotel Quisisana on Capri, if you want to really get specific. But most of the time I just eat my daughter's leftover Breyer's chocolate ice cream.

Smile

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:04 am Reply with quote
toniroussel
 
Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Manassas, VA


Hmm, thanks! Though I've never heard the term "water ice," I've had Italian Ice and gelato. Gelato is becoming quite trendy in some of the neighborhoods near U Pitt.
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Go, webhill!
PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:28 am Reply with quote
DrexelGal
 
Joined: 26 Jun 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


I'm from Philly too, and "wudder" ice is THE treat on a hot day!

Speaking of "wudder," that is one of the key words for discerning if one is from Philadelphia or its close environs.

We also say "Flahrida" and "ahrnge" instead of "Florida" and "orange."

I could think of more, but I gotta get back to work!
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Re: Go, webhill!
PostPosted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:11 pm Reply with quote
webhill
 
Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 50


DrexelGal wrote:
I'm from Philly too, and "wudder" ice is THE treat on a hot day!

Speaking of "wudder," that is one of the key words for discerning if one is from Philadelphia or its close environs.


I'm with you on that - not so much on the Florida thing, but I kinda get what you mean about orange. Your description of the Florida pronunciation seems more like my dad's - and he's from Brookline, MA Smile

But with respect to water, when I was in college, I took a class on standard american stage dialect. My instructor asked us all to go around and state our names and hobbies, and then she would tell us where we were from. So, I went to UC Berkeley, so it went pretty much like this:

-first person spoke, teacher said "you're from San Diego," first person said "yeah, I am from (suburb of San Diego)!"
-second person, "you're from the valley," "Yes!"
-third, "you're from northern CA" "Yes"
-and so on with the teacher stating a region or large city the student was from. Then it was my turn, and she said "you're from Wyncote, PA." "HOW DID YOU KNOW THAT?" I asked. She said "well, I'm from Lower Merion. Wyncote has a very distinct subaccent." (NB Lower Merion is maybe 20-30 minutes from Wyncote, PA).

Amazing, that was. Oh, and she squirted me with a water pistol every time I said "wudder" until I stopped saying that!

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Re: Shaved Ice?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:52 pm Reply with quote
stringd
 
Joined: 22 Jun 2006
Posts: 9


toniroussel wrote:
Do any other variations of the term shaved ice exist in other areas?

Growing up in Salt Lake City, we had sno-cones and "rainbow snows," named after the little rainbow-color kiosks that dotted the city.

Now in my little town of Springville, my kids ask if we can go get "snowies," also named after the little kiosks that can be found throughout the valley.
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Flavored Ice Treat
PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:54 pm Reply with quote
Robbob14
 
Joined: 11 Jul 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Erie, Pennsylvania


I have heard, and probably have used most of these words. Someone mentioned this being popular in Hawaii and it made me recall being at a fair and seeing stands that sold "Hawaiian Ice".

They all sound good to me Very Happy
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Re: Shaved Ice?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 5:03 pm Reply with quote
iuchiban
 
Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 30
Location: Greeley, CO


stringd wrote:
toniroussel wrote:
Do any other variations of the term shaved ice exist in other areas?

Growing up in Salt Lake City, we had sno-cones and "rainbow snows," named after the little rainbow-color kiosks that dotted the city.

Now in my little town of Springville, my kids ask if we can go get "snowies," also named after the little kiosks that can be found throughout the valley.


Our local version also comes from the name of a loacl institution, Tropical Sno...It is effectively shaved ice Hawaiian style but called something different.

I was also introduced to the EeeGee (that spalling may be wrong) in Arizona, which is basically a drinkable Italian Ice.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:08 pm Reply with quote
Brewedstrat
 
Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 11
Location: DeKalb, Illinois


From my experience, a snow cone is a paper cone filled with crushed ice with flavored syrup poored over the top. Usually the colors are red and blue, and when I was younger it was always fun to wait for it to melt a bit so you would have purple ice in the cone. Italian Ice is something completely different around here (North Illinois). Italian Ice usually comes in a cup or something resembling a margarine tub. The surface of the frozen treat is scraped with a spoon until therre's nothing left.

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Re: shaved ice as sno-cones
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 7:18 pm Reply with quote
Goblin
 
Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 4
Location: South San Francisco


Howard Shepherd wrote:
I remember seeing a show on PBS a few years ago about Hawaii, and hearing the term "shave-ice" for the first time (referring to what I knew as a "sno-cone").

Shave-Ice is very different from a Sno-Cone: Sno-Cones are essentially cups crushed ice with syrup, Shave-Ice is literally shaved off of a larger block of ice - it has a much finer texture than a Sno-Cone - and the syrup combination choices tend to be more complex than those offered by Sno-Cone venders. I have to admin, once I tried Shave-Ice, I swore off Sno-Cones, they just couldn't compare ^__^

As for the names; I never heard anyone call Shave-Ice a Sno-Cone while I was living in Hawai'i, it was always "Shave-Ice". Moreover, I've only heard the term "shaved-ice" since my return to the mainland United States, and it has always sounded like hyper-correction to me having become so accustomed to the Hawai'ian moniker.

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Shaved Ice?
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