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You ain't from around here....
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 12:35 pm Reply with quote
Kaa
 
Joined: 06 Oct 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA


I just listened to the podcast (Slurring and Elision, episode 68) where Dave is talking about a town in Virginia spelled Staunton, pronounced by locals as STAN-ton, so if someone says "STAWN-ton," you know "they ain't from around here."

I can think of several good examples from central Alabama where I grew up, and thought I'd share them.

There is a town called Mantua. Natives pronounce it "MAN-chu-ay" with a definite long "a" on that last syllable.

Then there is Arab, Alabama. Pronounced "AY-rab," always. NEVER like the people. Of course, Arabs the people are often pronounced the same way as the city in Alabama, but that's a whole other topic.

Pronunciation of Birmingham either 1) without a secondary stress and a drawn-out short 'a' sound on the last syllable or 2) as in the British city of the same name very quickly identifies you as a non-native.

Then there's "Clanton," which has no 't' when pronounced by natives (Clannon) and Mobile, which is properly "mo BEEL" and not like the moving art (MO b(schwa)l).

Finally, I'll leave you with the name of my hometown: Eutaw. :) It's easy to tell people who aren't used to seeing it every day because they stumble over it. I always tell people to say it like the state Utah, but draaawwwwl it out: YEW-taw.

Love the podcast. It makes me think a lot, and that's a good thing, especially when I'm listening at work. :)

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 1:21 pm Reply with quote
Yutolia
 
Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 5


another example i know is my state name: colorado. people who are not from here pronounce it with the 'a' like in 'ball', but people who are born and raised here pronounce that 'a' with something much closer to the sound in 'apple' - it is actually a funny /ae/ + /E/ diphthong.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:42 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


Yutolia wrote:
another example i know is my state name: colorado. people who are not from here pronounce it with the 'a' like in 'ball', but people who are born and raised here pronounce that 'a' with something much closer to the sound in 'apple' - it is actually a funny /ae/ + /E/ diphthong.
As I mentioned in my conversation with the Reduced Shakespeare Company in the Abridgment edition, I was surprised to discover the same thing happening in Las Vegas: the name of the state in which LV is located is Nevada, with the middle syllable rhyming with "add."

Must be a Western thing, I guess! Very Happy

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2007 12:39 pm Reply with quote
tristanjay7
 
Joined: 15 Oct 2006
Posts: 28
Location: Madison, WI


People not from Wisconsin say "we scon sin" whereas Wisconsites say "wis co~ sin" where the vowel changes and the [n] is not pronounced, though the vowel is nasalized.
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Here in Vermont
PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 3:33 pm Reply with quote
curiouser
 
Joined: 19 Jul 2008
Posts: 3
Location: Vermont


We know that Vermont's t is silent.

We have some surprising shibboleths in the Green Mountain state:
Calais is pronounced callous and Charlotte is Shar-LOT.

If you pronounce these names the way we've heard that they say 'em in such foreign places as France and North Carolina, then we'll know that you're from Away.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 2:27 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


I'll now know how to be a fake Vermonter!

Curiouser, I am especially intrigued by your choice of a verdant typeface for your reply! Very Happy

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:17 pm Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


Dave wrote:
I'll now know how to be a fake Vermonter!

Curiouser, I am especially intrigued by your choice of a verdant typeface for your reply! :D


In fact, the curiosity over the verdancy is mounting by the minute!
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Gettin' greasy
PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:28 pm Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


Okay, time to "go there." Dave, you and your little bro hail from the southeast, and I've heard you pronounce "greasy" as greezy (whereas all well-reared Yanks pronounce it as a rhyme to "fleecy"). Are there other words in this paradigm? I also remember you voice the "s" in "prosody" whereas I don't. (I may pick up others in future podcasts.)

In my Up-North American English, I voice the sibilant in these words:
ease/easy
please/pleasing
diseased
tease/teaser
easel/weasel
cheese/cheesy

But I devoice the "s" in these words:
crease/decrease/increase
lease/release
decease/deceasing
obese/obesity
Theresa
Lisa
prosody/prosodic

I'm sure there are others, but this is a start. Your turn.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 12:56 am Reply with quote
Kathleen S.
 
Joined: 26 Sep 2007
Posts: 10


Bloomer, as a west-coast American native, I was right with you on all of the pronunciations until the very end.
Interestingly enough, I tend to say proZody while at the same time proSodic.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 1:16 am Reply with quote
Bloomer
 
Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 136
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


Kathleen S. wrote:
Bloomer, as a west-coast American native, I was right with you on all of the pronunciations until the very end.
Interestingly enough, I tend to say proZody while at the same time proSodic.


KS,

Interesting. I wonder what triggers that. Actually, if we voice the sibililant in "easy," we should do the same in "greasy"...but we don't.

There is some pattern in English with voicing: an intervocalic "s" is voiced when the "s" begins a stressed syllable. For example: diZease, deZert, deZire, deZign, reZist, reZerve.... (This would predict proZodic and proSody in your dialect, however.)

An intervocalic "s" in Spanish is voiceless (e.g., caSa), but it's voiced in Portuguese (e.g., caZa). Go figger.

Alan
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You ain't from around here....
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