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What American accent do you have?
PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 3:58 am Reply with quote
Monika
 
Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Hamburg, Germany


Teehee... I took this test...
What American accent do you have?

Your Result: The Northeast
Judging by how you talk you are probably from north Jersey, New York City, Connecticut or Rhode Island. Chances are, if you are from New York City (and not those other places) people would probably be able to tell if they actually heard you speak.

http://www.gotoquiz.com/what_american_accent_do_you_have

Very Happy
Monika
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 5:03 am Reply with quote
Tonamel
 
Joined: 08 Jul 2006
Posts: 38


Quote:
"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent."


Hahaha!

It's right, though. I'm from Ohio, currently residing in Indiana. The accent is very, very neutral. Very similar to the Pacific Northwest, which it almost put me in.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 7:52 am Reply with quote
Dennis
 
Joined: 05 Dec 2006
Posts: 26
Location: Bethesda, MD


Hey, the quiz was really fun and it pegged me perfectly as being from the west, even though I now live in the east. Thanks for the link.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 4:55 pm Reply with quote
Monika
 
Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Hamburg, Germany


I agree that was one of the better tests found online. What's esp. funny is that I have a german accent, when speaking english. I can pronounce the TH, though.
Unlike this guy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0v6xbo-a5pc
Caution! The video is NOT safe for office use, and don't eat or drink anything while viewing. Twisted Evil

I can't really place american accents, I'm better with the ones in the UK. Most speakers don't notice they are speaking with an accent of some sorts. This test is good at making aware of it. It seems that mostly vowels are making the difference. (OK, not in the south of England, where most speakers say "fank you" and not "thank you", I really had trouble to understand people from that area.)

Monika
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:01 am Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


Hmm. I don't know. This thing put me as being from Philadelphia, or if not from there, then from South Jersey or Baltimore.

I know those accents, but mine is truly nothing like those. (This accent actually extends down into Washington, DC--if you can find a native speaker of "Mid-Atlantic-American" here.)

I was surprised the quiz didn't ask about the letter "I" in different situations. As I've mentioned, that's an identifier within western North Carolina.

I'm working on my ability to distinguish German accents, but I really can only vaguely distinguish Hamburg, Berlin, south Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. And even my ability to perceive these is not 100% accurate.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 5:31 pm Reply with quote
Monika
 
Joined: 22 Jul 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Hamburg, Germany


Southern Germany is devided in two distinct diaglect regions, one is Bairisch, which is in one dialect group with austrian dialects, the other is Alemanisch, which is closely related to the German spoken in Switzerland.

Television has been a great equaliser, all announcers use the standard pronunciation. (Of course we have a standard, this is Germany after all Wink ) So the differences are becoming smaller and smaller, making it harder for a non native speaker to distinguish between dialects, a native speaker of course still can do so. Living in Germany for a while should make you able to do so too.
If you want to see some German TV: http://www.onlinetvrecorder.com/
They have regional programming as well, like NDR for northern Germany, or BR for Bavaria. As far as I know, you can use those recordings in your classes without copyright violation.

Monika
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 5:02 pm Reply with quote
Kryssye
 
Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Atlanta


Quote:
"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.


Interesting. With the exception of Virginia and Guam, it mentions most of the places I have lived in my life. I grew up in NE Kentucky, so close to southern Ohio I could almost reach across the river and touch it. Then we moved to (in order) Florida, Virginia, Guam and Atlanta.

By the way, I was trying to maintain my "just lurking" status on this message board but I have now made two posts. Please, I beg of you, stop posting things that force me to come out of hiding. Wink



?He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.? ? Winston Churchill
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Philadelphia
PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:22 am Reply with quote
julie
 
Joined: 20 Jun 2006
Posts: 47
Location: Washington DC


With the midlands a VERY close second.

With regard to German, I spent two months in Germany in 2005, learning the language. The first month was in Berlin, the second was in Bonn. When I got to Bonn the difference in language was pronounced, and my teacher said I had a distinct Berlin sound to my speech. (No doubt he was the only person to identify it over my American accent).

For what it is worth, I think that any German speaker who pronounces "ich" as if it ended in a "k" must be from that upper northwest portion of the country - lots of people in Bonn spoke that way.

It was very wierd in Berlin when a student did that (and there was one that did) since the ch was much, much softer there (though not as soft as when I got out to Dresden.)

Julie

Julie

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:57 pm Reply with quote
ptillen
 
Joined: 14 Apr 2007
Posts: 22


Whoa! Freaky.
I got pegged as from Philadelphia also, which is funny considering I've lived in Milwaukee Wisconsin my whole life. What's that about, I wonder?
There is a Milwaukee dialect of sorts; think the movie "Fargo". My Germanic farm relatives all talk like that, but my mother worked very hard to make sure we didn't.
Anyway, none of those questions would have identified that dialect.
Here are a few that would:
Do you pronounce the last day of the work week
1. Fri-day
or
2. Fry-dee?

Do you answer in the affirmative by saying
1. Yes
2. Yeah
or
3. Ya,
or, in extreme cases
4. Ya dere hey?

Do you express assent or agreement by saying
1. Right
2. Isn't that so
or
3. Aina?

Would you indicate your intention to visit an eating establishment by saying
1. Let's stop by the Legion; they have an excellent Friday night fish fry
or
2. Let's go down by the Legion dere, dey got a really good Frydee nyte fish fry dere, aina?
Ya!!
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:01 pm Reply with quote
doodah
 
Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 28
Location: Spain


Wow! interesting! Thanks for the link!

Got the midland accent! (It makes me laugh!) (Well, I suppose it shows that the Midland accent is the closest to a kind of US American standard... ???)

Pronunciation is something which I keep mostly under the US American (standard) influence - the hardest part is being consistent in terms of spelling and vocabulary, because of the influence in Europe of the UK standard...
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2007 5:33 pm Reply with quote
Yutolia
 
Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 5


i got put in the midland for some reason, even though i'm from colorado - i never went to any of those states mentioned (pennsylvania, ohio, etc) until i was in high school. i agree with ptillen, none of those questions would have determined my accent anyway - they are mostly for determining whether someone is from the NE or the south. if they had asked whether i pronounce the vowel in the third syllable of colorado as 'a' as in 'ball' or 'a' as in close to the sound in 'apple' they might have pegged me better.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:42 pm Reply with quote
bnt
 
Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 19


I got "Northeast" for some reason, but more Philadelphia than Boston, which is what I would have thought. On every one of those "are they the same" questions, I answered "different", if that's any guide: I do far more reading than speaking, and I think that affects how I talk.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2007 12:35 pm Reply with quote
tristanjay7
 
Joined: 15 Oct 2006
Posts: 28
Location: Madison, WI


I speak Wisconsin English. I don't say caught and cot the same way. I say things like "You wanna come with [me]" and "I am in the bank yet."
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2007 2:59 pm Reply with quote
Dave
 
Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 357
Location: Washington, DC


tristanjay7 wrote:
I say things like "You wanna come with [me]" and "I am in the bank yet."

I love those German calques. (I think that's what those are, right? Direct word-for-word translations?)

"You wanna come with?" = "Willst du mitkommen?"

"I am in the bank yet." = "Ich bin noch bei der Bank."

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 11:50 am Reply with quote
tristanjay7
 
Joined: 15 Oct 2006
Posts: 28
Location: Madison, WI


I wouldn't call these calques because I can use them in many many structures (I can use them generatively so to speak). I can end tons of sentences with positive yet, which to the rest of the country is ungrammatical. Additionally, I can do a lot of come with sentences: Will you ask Dave if he's coming with?

The research done here says that Wisconsin English is like this because of the pervasive German influence here. Dave, you noticed this instantly.

In some small communities, you can still find old people who speak German as their native language. Culturally, I know of no Wisconsinite who doesn't like bratwursts with sauerkraut on top.
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What American accent do you have?
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