Register FAQ Memberlist Search The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index Visit our homepage

The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index » Literature » What is the last book you reread? Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Post new topic  Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic 
Re-read for pleasure and for practice
PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 2:35 pm Reply with quote
tbentley
 
Joined: 15 Dec 2006
Posts: 2
Location: simpsonville, sc


I'm now re-reading two books: The Mother Tongue, English and How It Got That Way by Bill Bryson, a terrific venture into its subject, and Marcovaldo by Italo Calvino, to keep brushed up on my Italian. Really, the second time 'round is tastier, like going back for another bottle of a fine wine.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Re: Re-read for pleasure and for practice
PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 3:21 am Reply with quote
RabiAkiva
 
Joined: 28 Jun 2006
Posts: 163
Location: Israel


tbentley wrote:
I'm now re-reading two books: The Mother Tongue, English and How It Got That Way by Bill Bryson, a terrific venture into its subject, and Marcovaldo by Italo Calvino, to keep brushed up on my Italian. Really, the second time 'round is tastier, like going back for another bottle of a fine wine.


Wow, that sounds really good. I'll take those two titles for my reading list. I know Bill Bryson from a short history of everything (or something like that) out of which I have read some parts twice.
And Italian literature is a bit of a blind spot in my spectrum -- so why not try Calvino?
Thanks a lot T!

_________________
l'hypocrisie c'est l'hommage du vice la vertu
Anne is a man; the blog: http://anneisaman.blogspot.com
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
Me Too!
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 5:16 pm Reply with quote
diana
 
Joined: 19 Mar 2007
Posts: 2
Location: Vancouver, BC


I thought I was the only nerd who has read "The Name of the Rose" over and over again, my first introduction to it was when I was a volunteer at a retirement home where I read it to a couple of seniors, we all loved it. I then got my hands on an audio book version which I also loved, saw the movie which left me disappointed and then got a paper back version which has followed me to 4 countries, the book had pages falling out of it, suffered cockatiel damage (my pet would sit on it while I read, silly bird!) been lent and forcibly retrieved on many occasions and is currently floating out into the abyss on the Rio Plata heading out to sea due to an unfortunate accident I had on a ferry ride between Argentina and Paraguay (sigh Sad ). Everytime I read it I would discover new and wonderful insights.

But dear Word Nerd friends, I have also reread: the Hobbit, Pride and Prejudice and a beatuiful essay written by Wade Davis called "Light at the Edge of the World: A journey through the Realm of Vanashing Cultures" which by the way I highly recommend.

my two cents worth
Diana
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:04 pm Reply with quote
Waterfall
 
Joined: 19 Mar 2007
Posts: 5
Location: Western North Carolina


I work at a bookstore, and I think I'm a bit of a liability in that you'll never find me reading (and recommending, and trying to sell) the most recently published book out there. I'm always too busy re-reading the good books I've already read. Currently I'm re-reading Walker Percy's The Moviegoer.

I re-read novels (and poems, and other stuff) for so many reasons. The first time I read something, I generally mostly read it for the story--the entertainment, you might say. After that, I read on a deeper level, finding meanings and patterns and stuff like that. Because I am a writer, I read as a writer, too, looking at how the masters of the art handled issues of plot, characterization, dialogue, etc., and learning from them (I hope).

I like what someone wrote about reading to see how you've grown or changed over the years. I get something different out of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance every time I read it.

That's the wonderful thing about art--no matter how many times you look at a great painting, or hear a great piece of music, or read a great book, there is always more to discover--about the art, about the artist, about the world, about yourself.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:37 pm Reply with quote
ptillen
 
Joined: 14 Apr 2007
Posts: 22


benconservato, please speak some more about the banning of To Kill A Mockingbird if you would. I'm sure most here would agree that it's a positive, inspiring read.
Also, my recent re-read was Wicked, a really thought-provoking story. I don't think I'm doing a spoiler by saying that Elphaba is a far different character than in the show, albeit no less memorable and compelling!
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 6:36 pm Reply with quote
Nom Deguerre
 
Joined: 07 May 2007
Posts: 2


pdejager makes excellent points about the reasons for rereading books. Whenever I am sick enough to have to stay in bed for a day or two, I will typically reread an old familiar book; it's kind of like "comfort food". Often it is either Heinlein or (if I'm feeling especially low) one of the P.G. Wodehouse "Jeeves and Wooster" books.

I'd also add that sometimes, you get a lot out of a book at a certain point in your life, but it doesn't hold up to rereading because you've since moved past that point.
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 8:45 am Reply with quote
Xpontix
 
Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 3


I have read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy- Douglas Adams again and elso I have read Charles Bukowski.
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 10:13 pm Reply with quote
ptillen
 
Joined: 14 Apr 2007
Posts: 22


I wanna toss in my two cents' worth about Jeeves & Wooster being the literary equivalent of comfort food- even an ice cream sundae. I'm just finishing Bill Clinton's autobio, and before that Jon Cinck's "Finn", a beautiful work, but very dark and just about completely devoid of cheer.
By Jove, I do so need a little pick-me-up right about now. Jeeves, fix me one of your miracle elixirs!
Very good, sir, just as you say.
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:40 am Reply with quote
Regina
 
Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 8
Location: Berlin, Germany


The last book I reread was Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obsure because I was writing an essay about it. I read it twice in a relatively short period of time which was great because the second time you pay much more attention to detail and parts of it become more significant when you already know the ending.
When I was a kid I read Adventure's of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer about 6 times. I used to read it when I was feeling upset about something because it took me to this different world and I felt like a friend to Tom, Huck and Jim and all the other characters who had become so familiar to me. Maybe I should give it another go nowadays and see if the feeling is still the same.
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 2:57 pm Reply with quote
shahnlgh
 
Joined: 05 Aug 2007
Posts: 3
Location: Germany


The book I am just reading is "The English Patient" by Michael Ondaatje, last time was about ten years ago. Still love it, though... Wink

Sebastian
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2007 6:17 am Reply with quote
Mister Micawber
 
Joined: 17 Nov 2007
Posts: 7
Location: Yokohama


.
Sorry, just got here. I'm in the midst of a ponderous re-reading of Remembrance of Things Past, although now it seems to be called In Search of Lost Time. I ought to know better. If I finish before I die, I'm going back to Bertie Wooster too.
.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:27 am Reply with quote
Eileen Ann
 
Joined: 27 Jun 2008
Posts: 42


As you might deduce, I am just getting around all of the posts within the title areas available on the nerds of the word. I have re-read D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers. The interesting thing about it is that I last read it more than twenty years' ago. This time around it conveyed much, much more to me because of a particular aspect of my life at this time, so I believe that we read and take in that which we are capable of doing at that time in our lives. On later reading its impacts can be different because we are changing our perspectives continuously - in regard to life-experience. One book I have read about five times is Karen Blixen's Out of Africa and Other Stories. There is so much richness in her writing and the other stories are highly insightful, spiritual, delightful to savour.

Bill Bryson - a great favourite in this household with all of his books read and re-read. Often, in response to a question on science, say my husband will say "...according to Bill. . .". I wonder if Bill Bryson knows that he has become a great institution! He can write very complex and literary books and very light, highly funny travel books but with that insight that the reader knows comes from a depth that enables him to convey the hilarity about quite mundane situations!
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Heart of Darkness
PostPosted: Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:44 pm Reply with quote
therealalxconway
 
Joined: 14 Oct 2008
Posts: 2


Heart of Darkness
View user's profile Send private message
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 2:20 am Reply with quote
DarkKnightJared
 
Joined: 29 Nov 2008
Posts: 4
Location: Arizona


The two books that I seem to keep re-reading at the moment are Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson and Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website AIM Address MSN Messenger
Kurt Vonnegut's "Timequake"
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 1:56 pm Reply with quote
LitMajorGirl
 
Joined: 02 Jan 2009
Posts: 6
Location: Indiana


But first a confession: I have only read this book once. However, this is post that I found to be pertinent to The Word Nerds forum and something I hope Dave Shepard finds to be just as interesting as I did.

I was reading Timequake last night and ran across a fictional anecdote that I thought the German teacher might get a kick out of.

In this blip, Vonnegut's alter ego, Kilgore Trout, has written a short story, which he promptly trashes as with all his other work, about a psychiatrist named Dr. Schadenfreude.

Well, as an avid and dedicated listener of The Word Nerds, this name jumped out at me. I pondered over whether this name is tied to the often referred to German phrase that Dave has explained in the podcast to mean (and mind you I'm paraphrasing here) "taking pleasure or gain from another's dispair or failure".

I have not taken German (however I am hoping to enroll by the end of senior year of high school; I'm just starting the second semester of my junior year) but would like to know if this name corrolates to the German phrase.

Thanks,
B
View user's profile Send private message
What is the last book you reread?
  The Word Nerds Discussion Forum Index » Literature
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
All times are GMT - 4 Hours  
Page 3 of 4  
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
  
  
 Post new topic  Reply to topic  



Powered by phpBB  © phpBB Group phpBB Style by Trushkin.net